Review: The Age of Missing Information

In his 1992 book The Age of Missing Information, author and environmentalist Bill McKibben seeks answers to what constitutes real information in our age of increasingly accessible images, print, audio, and video.  He watched all that cable TV had to offer in a 24-hour span, comparing the sedentary experience to 24-hours in an unfettered natural…

To the Presidential Candidates: Q & A’s We Should Hear

I cringe when I watch the Presidential debates.  My heart rate elevates slightly.   I keep waiting for questions and answers that nobody wants to hear, questions and answers that we should hear, but they never come.  Below, I imagine some questions and answers that, unfortunately, we’ll never see or hear: While the 20th Century provided…

Why $100,000 Teacher Salaries Make Sense

Many American educators–myself included–often remind ourselves and others that we didn’t enter education for the money.  I certainly don’t teach to become wealthy, but as I see outstanding educator colleagues and friends leave the classroom for higher-paying, often lower-stress jobs in education, I wonder what it would take to increase the tenure of experienced, skilled…

Balloons, Climate Change, and the Future

What would it take for people to see their impact on the environment, in relation to climate change?  After a few moments of deliberation, my friend and mentor Rowan Claypool said Balloons. Imagine that for all of your activity responsible for CO2 emissions, large ugly balloons filled with CO2 trailed you wherever you traveled.  If…

The Myth of Progress–What Can Nature Teach Us?

If you plant too much in a small space, competition for soil, water, and sunlight will result in diminished garden productivity.  Something will lose out on the aforementioned energy resources. My experiment with grape vines has proven poor planning on my part–rapid growth, root system, and large leaves have overtaken a small strip of garden…